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Author Topic: Setting Main and Monitor EQ  (Read 2437 times)

Brad Weber

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Re: Setting Main and Monitor EQ
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2013, 07:51:08 am »

I'm pretty sure that the main speaker's HF drivers aren't in very good shape because I had to boost many of the high and upper mids to get decent sound.
How much boost and how many bands?  You should generally be cutting more than you boost.
 
I don't think it is possible to definitively identify the speakers from the very limited information provided, but if they are 25 or so years old and have not been serviced then they very well may have reached the end of their life without some repairs.  However, if they are a two way box with a 15" woofer then it would usually be pretty obvious if a HF driver or crossover was toast and that would typically not be something you could correct with EQ.  And while it sound unlikely, you may want to make sure you don't have something like a biamped system where all you really need to do is turn up the HF amplifier or turn down the LF amp or any other processing in the system.
 
As far as repairing or replacing the speakers, it they are more than a few years old then it is pretty common for a church's needs and expectations related to audio to have changed.  So you might need to assess not only if the speakers are performing properly but also if they are capable of serving the church's current and near future needs and goals.  If they can provide acceptable output, response, coverage, intelligibility, etc. then at least looking at repairs may make sense, otherwise it may be more effective to look at replacing them.
 
I'm not concerned about people "messing with" the EQ settings on the mixer so whether the processing is separate or not isn't much of a concern. The person who primarily runs the system is pretty overwhelmed with the whole digital mixer thing so I doubt he'll ever be doing much more that basic mixing(pushing the faders/mute buttons and minor channel EQ settings)
Why would a church purchase a mixer that their primary operator cannot operate effectively?  And if there are overriding reasons to do so, wouldn't it then be a priority to help that person become comfortable with operating the mixer?
 
I suggest you save whatever you come up with to multiple presets on the mixer since it sounds like the settings and even the base preset scene could be inadvertently changed or overwritten.
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Tommy Peel

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Re: Setting Main and Monitor EQ
« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2013, 10:26:06 am »

How much boost and how many bands?  You should generally be cutting more than you boost.

I boosted(slightly; maybe +2-3dB max) maybe 4-6 bands(mostly in the upper mid to high range but I think I boosted 1-2 in the low end too) and cut(slightly) that many or maybe a few more. Some of the people I talked to after church yesterday though it sounded better and I had no complaints; the music I played when tuning the system sounded noticeably clearer(more "normal") with the adjustments when enabling and bypassing the EQ after I adjusted it.


I don't think it is possible to definitively identify the speakers from the very limited information provided, but if they are 25 or so years old and have not been serviced then they very well may have reached the end of their life without some repairs.  However, if they are a two way box with a 15" woofer then it would usually be pretty obvious if a HF driver or crossover was toast and that would typically not be something you could correct with EQ.  And while it sound unlikely, you may want to make sure you don't have something like a biamped system where all you really need to do is turn up the HF amplifier or turn down the LF amp or any other processing in the system.

 My best guess as to their age is 20 years give or take a couple(based on them being new when the sanctuary was built). I know they aren't biamped; there is a single 1/4 inch (TR) cable going from a jack on the wall to the speaker. Also there are only 2 power amps; one for the stereo mains and one for the 2 monitor channels being used.

As far as repairing or replacing the speakers, it they are more than a few years old then it is pretty common for a church's needs and expectations related to audio to have changed.  So you might need to assess not only if the speakers are performing properly but also if they are capable of serving the church's current and near future needs and goals.  If they can provide acceptable output, response, coverage, intelligibility, etc. then at least looking at repairs may make sense, otherwise it may be more effective to look at replacing them.

Right now the speakers meet the needs of the church fairly well and I'm reluctant to recommend new ones because in another 5 or so years it's possible that the church could go to a more contemporary type worship service(right now it's very traditional with only a piano). If/when this happens there will be a number of changes that need to be made to the system and most likely a professional would be called in to upgrade the system.

Why would a church purchase a mixer that their primary operator cannot operate effectively?  And if there are overriding reasons to do so, wouldn't it then be a priority to help that person become comfortable with operating the mixer?
 
I suggest you save whatever you come up with to multiple presets on the mixer since it sounds like the settings and even the base preset scene could be inadvertently changed or overwritten.

I'm sure with some practice and guidance he'll be able to operate the system well enough for most situations. I've shown him how to mute/unmute channels, select a channel and adjust the monitor volume and channel EQ. I set the CD/Tape/iPod inputs to where they're controlled by DCA 1 so he won't have to "page over" to them on the aux input page. We're only using maybe 8-12 inputs max during a typical service(and not all at the same time). And yes I realize that the x32 is overkill for this but they wanted "room to grow" so it made sense.

Thanks for the advise,
Tommy
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Nick Simon

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yep,
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2013, 11:08:16 am »

been right where you are... at my previous church.
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