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Author Topic: Truck roof repair  (Read 3077 times)

Riley Casey

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Truck roof repair
« on: October 16, 2012, 04:40:19 pm »

Every once in a while the prosaic side of running a sound company comes to the fore.  Two of our trucks have translucent fiber roofs on their boxes and over time, with the occasional corner Banging into an I moveable object the roofs have developed leaks.  Anyone have some pointers on DYI repairs that can be made?  The local truck body shops seem to have their pricing stuck at pre 2008 levels.

Thanks for any suggestions

Bob Leonard

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Re: Truck roof repair
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2012, 06:45:42 pm »

Riley,
Go to Home depot and buy some roof edging, the sticky black rubber shit that comes on a roll and is used around the edge of the roof under the shingles and over the drip edge. Cut it into squares or whatever fits and stick it on. Only good for 20 years though.
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Steve Hurt

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Re: Truck roof repair
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2012, 06:58:57 pm »

Here's a link to what Bob is talking about.
It's sold in 36" wide rolls, resembles roll roofing, but it's peel and stick.
It's a very good water barrier on homes. 
Goes on roofs in the valleys peaks and edges before shingles.
If you drive a nail through it, it seals around the nail.  Good stuff.
Never used it on a truck, but it would probably work.

btw, They also sell it in narrow width rolls like 12"  for use around windows and doors.
I buy it at a roofing and siding wholesaler.  Home Depot may have a more limited selection.

http://www.homedepot.com/buy/wr-grace-36-in-x-75-ft-grace-ice-water-shield-5003002.html#.UH3myGennSg
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Bob Leonard

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Re: Truck roof repair
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2012, 10:27:40 pm »

Thanks Steve.
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Truck roof repair
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2012, 01:20:38 am »

The fiberglass is actually glass fibers embedded in polyester resin. But you probably knew that.

You can get sheets of fiberglass fabric and cans of resin at most marine supply houses. Sand down the existing roof to expose clean resin. Then mix up some resin with the appropriate amount of hardener, saturate a piece of fabric in this, and stick it to the roof. You may need to run a roller over it to get rid of air bubbles. Pour a layer of resin over this to seal up the fibers.

The resulting repair might not be pretty, but it should be adequate.

That's the gist of it, but I'm no expert. Search YouTube for 'fiberglass repair' and you'll probably get better results.
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Geri O'Neil

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Re: Truck roof repair
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2012, 07:21:20 am »

For a quick and dirty idea (and who around here doesn't love those... ;D)...

I'm about to try the Flex-Seal stuff in a spray can and sold at Wal-Mart. It worked well on the roof of my house after a fallen tree limb knocked a hole right on the seam of my metal roof. It was intended as a temporary fix, but it has worked fine and shows no sign of deteriorating. I can report back, if you like...

Geri O
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Tim Weaver

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Re: Truck roof repair
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2012, 11:34:16 am »

For a quick and dirty idea (and who around here doesn't love those... ;D)...

I'm about to try the Flex-Seal stuff in a spray can and sold at Wal-Mart. It worked well on the roof of my house after a fallen tree limb knocked a hole right on the seam of my metal roof. It was intended as a temporary fix, but it has worked fine and shows no sign of deteriorating. I can report back, if you like...

Geri O

Will it fix my fishing boat? I accidentally installed a screen door in the bottom of it and now it won't float!
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George Dougherty

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Re: Truck roof repair
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2012, 06:17:19 pm »

Every once in a while the prosaic side of running a sound company comes to the fore.  Two of our trucks have translucent fiber roofs on their boxes and over time, with the occasional corner Banging into an I moveable object the roofs have developed leaks.  Anyone have some pointers on DYI repairs that can be made?  The local truck body shops seem to have their pricing stuck at pre 2008 levels.

Thanks for any suggestions
What kind of leaks?  Seams at the edges or across the surface?  I had leaks around the edges of mine. Grinder with a sanding disk took off most of the dried and cracking sealant in short order and a single tube of the grey roof caulking to reseal it all got it watertight. The grey caulking holds up well in the sun remaining flexible and lasts for many years. Probably much better than what first went on it.
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Scott Wagner

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Re: Truck roof repair
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2012, 12:28:58 pm »

The fiberglass is actually glass fibers embedded in polyester resin. But you probably knew that.
Just to clarify, fiberglass is glass fibers embedded in resin.  That resin is usually polyester or epoxy.  Polyester resin is much less expensive than epoxy resin.  Here's the rub: epoxy resin will bond to epoxy or polyester; however, polyester resin will only bond to polyester.  When making a repair, the safest route is to use epoxy resin.  If you use polyester, you've got a 50% chance of the repair failing.
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Scott Wagner
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Tim Weaver

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Re: Truck roof repair
« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2012, 12:41:57 pm »

Just to clarify, fiberglass is glass fibers embedded in resin.  That resin is usually polyester or epoxy.  Polyester resin is much less expensive than epoxy resin.  Here's the rub: epoxy resin will bond to epoxy or polyester; however, polyester resin will only bond to polyester.  When making a repair, the safest route is to use epoxy resin.  If you use polyester, you've got a 50% chance of the repair failing.

And this is the stuff to use.

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=17645


It's what all the boat yards use to repair hull damage.
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