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Author Topic: Sound absorption on the cheap  (Read 11262 times)

Rick Powell

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Re: Sound absorption on the cheap
« Reply #30 on: December 10, 2008, 09:45:37 pm »

Brad Ferguson wrote on Wed, 10 December 2008 01:22



I'm sourcing some 703, and I'm going to basically cover some ply with it, and some material.  Should be cheap enough, and I have some lines on some fire resistant material.




If the 703 has an open backing (such as a frame, with the 703 covered with fabric on both flat surfaces), and the panel is spaced a few inches away from the wall, you will have twice the absorption area.  When you mount flush to the wall, or put a solid backing on the panels, you are giving away half the panel's effectiveness potential.  Just a thought.  ATS puts their panels in a wooden slat frame much like a bedding frame, so that both flat surfaces are absorptive.

RP
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Rick Powell
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Brad Weber

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Re: Sound absorption on the cheap
« Reply #31 on: December 10, 2008, 11:47:57 pm »

Rick Powell wrote on Wed, 10 December 2008 21:45

If the 703 has an open backing (such as a frame, with the 703 covered with fabric on both flat surfaces), and the panel is spaced a few inches away from the wall, you will have twice the absorption area.  When you mount flush to the wall, or put a solid backing on the panels, you are giving away half the panel's effectiveness potential.  Just a thought.  ATS puts their panels in a wooden slat frame much like a bedding frame, so that both flat surfaces are absorptive.

If you spaced the panel several feet off the wall you could would likely get some effect from both sides but not at a spacing of a few inches.  That kind of spacing should help improve the low frequency absorption the panel provides but it has nothing to do with increasing, much less doubling, the effective surface area and I cannot find where ATS makes any such claim.  And unless you are referencing some other ATS Acoustics, they clearly state on their web site (http://www.atsacoustics.com/) that their standard acoustical panels, which are apparently offered only in 2" and 4" thicknesses, have a solid 1/4" wood back panel.  You can order the 4" thick panels without the wood back but it is not an option on the 2" thick panels.  Are you maybe thinking of some other manufacturer?
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Brad Weber
muse Audio Video

Brad Weber

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Re: Sound absorption on the cheap
« Reply #32 on: December 10, 2008, 11:58:19 pm »

Rick Powell wrote on Wed, 10 December 2008 21:37

A homemade version of the same could be expected to have similar results - it's not rocket science to build these things, and the material has consistent and well known properties.

It is the details like how you attach the fabric to and how you treat the edges that is where many DIY acoustical panel projects fail.  Most commercial acoustical panels have either a resin hardened edge for the actual substrate or use a plastic or metal edge, that is how they can get clean and consistent edges.  Many manufacturers also offer various versions of their panels such as abuse resistant 'high impact' panels with a material covering the substrate behind the fabric.  In some cases these other panel versions offer different absorption characteristics, there is at least one manufacturer offer a 'low frequency tuned' panel that use an internal septum for diaphragmatic absorption at lower frequencies.
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Brad Weber
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Terry Duoos

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Re: Sound absorption on the cheap
« Reply #33 on: December 16, 2008, 07:40:35 am »

I love when they (owners) talk teck.

I'v seen so muchmoney and labor wasted ..spent for not on acoustics trying to better or eliminate...what is it?!@@#.

First where is the meat of the complain.
His bartender cant hear the orders over the band?

or is Mr Bitchalot next door  just not likened to heavy metal at 1am?

Gotta know where to spend and in which direction.

If its leakage that generates complaints then put a spectrum analyzer muic on that guys porch and ask him to tell when things
are not acceptable...i had a case where it was just the floor tom and no other sound....not the bass niot the gigawattarshall stack just thart one freq of that one tiom that resonasted so extremely much....Tried a couple of methods to filter down that freq..100-ish i think ...found it was a mode swet up wall rto wall where drums were sert up...built traps there where the pressure was max and done deal.

Lots of his money could in deed go to acoustic endevours..nice if it eliminated cause...not bandaid symptom...
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Terry Duoos

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Re: Sound absorption on the cheap
« Reply #34 on: December 16, 2008, 07:45:13 am »

I ment to spell check ...sorry...
Typing with other hand.

terry
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